The franchise’s latest series on Disney+ sticks to the story but flushes a lot of the usual trappings out the airlock.

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Diego Luna (right, with Stellan Skarsgard) reprises the role of Cassian Andor in “Andor,” arriving Wednesday on Disney+

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As the big science-fiction and superhero franchises have proliferated, their mantra has been that television is a place for diversification and creative freedom

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to do something different, within reason. Hence Marvel’s strenuously meta “WandaVision” or Paramount’s goofy, animated “Star Trek: Lower Decks.”

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“Andor,” the most up-to-date collection within the “Star Wars” universe (premiering Wednesday on Disney+), doesn’t take one of those hard detours.

But it’s different in its own way. In the four (of 12) episodes available for review, it continually feels as if the people who made it like a lot of things

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“Blade Runner,” “Avatar,” “Casablanca,” Vietnam War metaphors — better than they like “Star Wars.”

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It’s common of “Star Wars” initiatives that the quality performances tend to be given by using robots.

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 That was the case in “Rogue One,” in which the hulking struggle droid voiced by way of Alan Tudyk became the pleasant reason to look at.

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“Andor” has a small, decrepit, R2-D2-like figure named B2EMO, voiced by Dave Chapman and sort of a cross between a toolbox and a shop vac.

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