Neil Armstrong was the first man on the Moon — but only a few pictures from the crew’s cameras show him on his historic moonwalk. In one of them (above), he is visible as a reflection in Buzz Aldrin’s helmet.

source:NASA

 Russia was first Yep, Russia (then the main country of the Soviet Union) beat the U.S. in spaceflight pretty much every step of the way until NASA landed people on the Moon. The first artificial satellite — Sputnik, launched Oct. 4, 1957 — was Russian

source:NASA

After returning to the Lunar Module, Neil Armstrong posed for Buzz Aldrin’s camera.

source:NASA

SpaceX’s Starship sheds its booster stage en route to Earth orbit in this artist’s concept.

source:SPACE X

Robert Goddard built the first rocket to use liquid fuel, a more sophisticated form of rocket propulsion than earlier solid-fuel rockets.

source:NASA

Sputnik was not very big — weighing just 185 pounds (84 kg) — but it made a big impact, including kickstarting the U.S. space program.

source:NASA

In his 1962 address at Rice University, John F. Kennedy sought to galvanize and convince the U.S. that it could achieve the goal he had set the year before

source:NASA

In 1965, Ed White became the first U.S. astronaut to perform a space walk — though in reality, it was more of a spacefloat.

source:NASA

When SpaceX successfully flies the Falcon Super Heavy and its upper stage, Starship, it will take the record for the largest rocket ever flown. SpaceX

source:SPACE X

Plus, human beings are pretty fragile creatures. So, exploring space means using special suits that allow astronauts to breathe and stay at the right temperature.

source:SPACE X

New models are already being used by SpaceX astronauts and will be used by the men and women who journey back to the Moon.

source:SPACE X

The International Space Station’s toilet may not look glamorous, but it’s a big improvement from the early days of space exploration.

source:SPACE X