Washington State University (WSU) researchers have revealed components the usage of as little as five%, as much as 100%, Martian regolith blended with a titanium alloy

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A small amount of simulated overwhelmed Martian rock, mixed with a titanium alloy, has been used to make a robust, high-performance material

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

l that could in the future be used to 3-D print gear or rocket parts on Mars. 

The elements were made by Washington State University (WSU) researchers with as little as 5%, as much as one hundred%, Martian regolith 

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 a black powdery substance intended to mimic the rocky, inorganic fabric located at the floor of the crimson planet.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

“In space, 3-d printing is something that has to happen if we want to think of a manned assignment

 because we sincerely can't bring everything from right here,” said Amit Bandyopadhyay

a professor in WSU’s School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. “And if we forgot something, we can't come again to get it.”