Nuclear bombs. That's the go-to answer for incoming space objects like asteroids and comets, as far as Hollywood is concerned.

source:upi

Movies like Deep Impact and Armageddon rely on nukes, delivered by stars like Bruce Willis, to save the world and deliver the drama.

source:upi

But planetary defense experts say in reality, if astronomers spotted a dangerous incoming space rock, the safest and best answer might be something more subtle

source:upi

That's just what NASA did on Monday evening, when a spacecraft headed straight into an asteroid, obliterating itself.

source:mLIVE

In images streamed as the impact neared, the egg-shaped asteroid, called Dimorphos, grew in size from a blip on screen to have its full rocky surface

source:mLIVE

Events transpired exactly as engineers had planned, they said, with nothing going wrong. "As far as we can tell our first planetary defense test was a success," said Elena Adams

source:mLIVE

The impact was the culmination of NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), a 7-year and more than $300 million effort which launched a space vehicle in November of 2021

source:mLIVE

She says the collision is just a nudge that's similar to "running a golf cart into the Great Pyramid."

source:mLIVE