School of Medicine joins essential NIH brain mapping attempt – Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

source:spillmanfarmer

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are joining a national network, supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to map the intricacies of the brain

source:spillmanfarmer

with a goal of deepening knowledge of how the brain works and generating new insights into how the brain functions in healthy people  and how it malfunctions in Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, autism and numerous other conditions.

source:getty images

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis are joining a national network to map the intricacies of the brain

source:hakwood

with a goal of deepening knowledge of how the brain works and generating new insights into how the brain functions in healthy people — and how it malfunctions in Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, autism and numerous other conditions.

source:hakwood

The new network, called the BRAIN Initiative Cell Atlas Network (BICAN), is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

source:hakwood

. One is led by the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, Wash., and establishes a global collaboration to map the 200 billion cells in the human brain by their type and function.

source:bvglazing

At Washington University, David C. Van Essen, PhD, the Alumni Endowed Professor of Neuroscience and Matthew F. Glasser, MD, PhD, an instructor in radiology at the university’s Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology

source:bvglazing

“The BICAN grant will add to this brain map an enormous amount of information about what genes are active and where they’re active, and how they are coordinated and integrated,” Van Essen said.

source:bvglazing