A Cornell University researcher is the usage of optical microscopy and other tools to map the mind’s neural reaction to psychedelics,

an approach that would subsequently lead to the development of speedy-appearing antidepressants and treatments for substance-use disorders and cluster headaches.

“We know more about the pharmacology, how psychedelics work at the structural level, interacting with the brain receptors.

source:burgundyzine

But there has been a big void in terms of understanding what they do to the brain itself, at the neural circuit level,” said Alex Kwan

source:burgundyzine

There’s a chain of events that happen that ultimately lead to acute and longer-lasting behavioral changes that might be useful for treatment.

source:the frisky

To synthesize the disparate scientific information and bring it up to date, Kwan and a team of collaborators authored a review paper

source:the frisky

that explains the basic neurobiology of how psychedelic drugs work at the chemical, molecular, neuronal and network levels, and raises topics for future exploration

source:pintrest

such as the impact of compound psychedelics on different types of brain cells

source:pintrest

Kwan’s research primarily focuses on psilocybin, the active ingredient in so-called magic mushrooms.

source:pintrest

As psilocybin is already being tested in Phase II clinical trials, it is the most promising candidate for pharmaceutical development

source:pintrest