Traditional foods are used to celebrate one of the most important days on the Jewish calendar: Rosh Hashanah, which is the Jewish New Year.

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"Pumpkin, leek and beats," she said, pointing to the produce on her dining room table. "They all symbolize the desire for peace."

"These are the days when we do an accounting of our soul," she said. "Improve ourselves and the world and have a better year next year."

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Treatman prepares each of the dishes she makes in a traditional style, much in the way that it's been done for thousands of years including the preparation of Biblical fruit honey

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But Treatman, who is a board member of the American Jewish Committee, realizes that not everyone in the Jewish faith gets to learn all of the traditions.

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It's not only a different greeting for the Jewish New Year but an entirely different year, which is not 2023.

This year is said to be significant as the country comes out of the pandemic.

It's meaningful, as Jewish families gather at synagogues and around traditional tables with traditional dishes.

"Apples are to wish for a sweet new year. We dip them usually in honey," Treatman said.