Starting around 1897, in the upper right corner of Page A1, The Times has offered perusers a fast sweep of the day's temperature and precipitation. In the newsroom, this block of type is known as the "climate ear."

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I've altered around 20,000 climate ears for precision and Times style throughout recent years

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Arranging these short conjectures was only one of my numerous obligations as the night news right hand on the Global work area. During each shift

I arranged 26 weather conditions conjectures to match the U.S. where The Times was printed: "Bay Coast: Mostly bright.

Rainstorms primarily in the early evening and night. Highs in the upper 80s to the lower 90s," or "Northwest: Mists and some daylight. Showers or rainstorms in a couple of regions. 

The change comes amid increased consolidation in the printing business. While The Times prints all of its New York edition newspapers at its printing plant in Queens

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the company has contracts with sites across the United States to print and distribute the national edition. As more printing plants close, however, newspapers, once printed close to their distribution areas, are printed farther away.

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Despite the brevity of the weather ears (each are only about five lines of text), there was a delicate choreography behind pulling off 26 of them. Publishing all of the ears “touched on every system within The Times

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